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Resources in Support of Black Lives Matter: Take Action

Organizations Working Against Racial Injustice

In Idaho

ACLU of Idaho: "The ACLU of Idaho is a non-partisan, non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation and enhancement of civil liberties and civil rights."

Boise State University African Student Association: "ASA is a student run organization comprised of African students of various ethnic/national backgrounds. This culturally, socially, and academically vibrant organization strives to promote a better understanding of the varying needs of African Students and the issues that they are confronted with globally and locally at Boise State University."

Boise State University Black Student Association: "Boise State Black Student Association (BSA) seeks to promote and nurture higher education among students of African descent to institutionalize the ideals, values, and beliefs of African cultures so as to promote their positive image."

Boise State University Student Diversity and Inclusion: "The office of Student Diversity and Inclusion is a collection of resources that includes Multicultural Student Services, the First Forward Student Success Program and the MLK Living Legacy Committee."

Idaho Coalition Against Sexual and Domestic Violence: "The Idaho Coalition Against Sexual & Domestic Violence works to be a leader in the movement to end violence against women and girls, men and boys – across the life span before violence has occurred – because violence is preventable."

Treasure Valley NAACP: "Locally, the Treasure Valley Branch was originally established 85 years ago to follow through on the promise of equal rights for all minority communities in Idaho. The branch was reformed in 1965 and has been actively fighting civil rights issues ever since. Today, our branch is proud to carry on the goals and objectives of the National Office for all citizens of Idaho."

University of Idaho Office of Multicultural Affairs: "The Office of Multicultural Affairs (OMA) seeks to broaden the University of Idaho’s commitment to cultural enrichment and academic excellence by maintaining an environment that supports multiculturalism and promotes inclusion." 

University of Idaho Black Student Union: "The purpose of the Black Student Union (BSU) is to support the advancement of black students, promote equality and unity among students on campus, celebrate black heritage and to provide a social atmosphere where students can meet and have open discussion. BSU is open to all students."  

YWCA of Idaho: "The YWCA of Lewiston, ID – Clarkston, WA is dedicated to empowering women, eliminating racism, and promoting peace, justice, freedom, and dignity for all. It is committed to building a strong community by actively promoting the value of diversity and the right to a life free from violence, poverty, and oppression."

National

Black Lives MatterBlack Lives Matter began as a call to action in response to state-sanctioned violence and anti-Black racism. Our intention from the very beginning was to connect Black people from all over the world who have a shared desire for justice to act together in their communities. The impetus for that commitment was, and still is, the rampant and deliberate violence inflicted on us by the state.

Equal Justice InitiativeThe Equal Justice Initiative is committed to ending mass incarceration and excessive punishment in the United States, to challenging racial and economic injustice, and to protecting basic human rights for the most vulnerable people in American society.

ACLUThe ACLU works in the courts, legislatures and communities to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed to all people in this country by the Constitution and laws of the United States.

NAACPThe mission of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) is to secure the political, educational, social, and economic equality of rights in order to eliminate race-based discrimination and ensure the health and well-being of all persons.

National Lawyer's GuildThe National Lawyers Guild is the nation’s oldest and largest progressive bar association and was the first one in the US to be racially integrated. Our mission is to use law for the people, uniting lawyers, law students, legal workers, and jailhouse lawyers to function as an effective force in the service of the people by valuing human rights and the rights of ecosystems over property interests. 

The Bail ProjectThe Bail Project, Inc. is a non-profit organization designed to combat mass incarceration by disrupting the money bail system ‒ one person at a time.

National Black Women's Justice InstituteThe National Black Women’s Justice Institute (NBWJI) works to reduce racial and gender disparities across the justice continuum affecting Black women, girls, and their families, by conducting research, providing technical assistance, engaging in public education, promoting civic engagement, and advocating for informed and effective policies.

Color of Change: "Color of Change leads campaigns that build real power for Black communities."

National Black Justice Coalition: "NBJC’s mission is to end racism, homophobia, and LGBTQ/SGL bias and stigma."

Take Action

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Demonstrate

ACLU Know Your Rights: ProtestersThe First Amendment protects your right to assemble and express your views through protest. However, police and other government officials are allowed to place certain narrow restrictions on the exercise of speech rights. Make sure you’re prepared by brushing up on your rights before heading out into the streets.

If you're planning to take part in protests, know your rights. Read this (CNN)Every American has the right to demonstrate peacefully. It's right there in the First Amendment. But it's not as simple as showing up with a sign. There are some measures officials can use to limit protests, and it's easy to accidentally tiptoe into legally murky territory if you don't know the specifics.

How to protect your rights and data during #Black Lives Matter protests (Above the Law): The right to protest is a fundamental one that deserves protection, and it's one that is essential to the preservation of our democracy.

Self Care

Counseling Services for University of Idaho Law Students (University of Idaho College of Law Handbook)

Law students in Moscow can take advantage of free confidential counseling and crisis intervention services provided by the UI Counseling and Testing Center, www.uidaho.edu/current-students/ctc, located at Mary Forney Hall in Moscow; contact the CTC at 208-885-6716 or ctc@uidaho.edu.

Boise State University’s Counseling Services provides law students in Boise with confidential short- and long-term counseling and crisis intervention at their location in the Norco Building on the Southeast side of BSU’s campus, https://healthservices.boisestate.edu/.

In addition, the following services are available to all law students in any location:

  • CTC’s crisis telephone counseling, 208-885-6716 after hours and on weekends
  • Idaho Lawyers Assistance Program 24-hour hotline, 866-460-9014
  • Idaho Suicide Prevention Hotline, 208-398-4357.
  • National Suicide Prevention Hotline, 800-273-8255
  • National Crisis Text Line is available by texting START to 741-741
  • In a mental health emergency at either College location, call 911

Sometimes students are reluctant to take advantage of counseling or substance abuse treatment for fear they will have to report this when applying for the bar. It’s important to know that mental health and substance use issues are not a barrier to bar admission: indeed, according to the ABA, 25% of attorneys have anxiety or depression. Rather, bar admission authorities favorably view applicants who actively seek treatment for mental / emotional health issues or alcohol /substance abuse.  

Disclaimer

The views, opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in these websites, articles, etc. are strictly those of the author(s). They do not necessarily reflect the views of the University of Idaho College of Law nor its personnel.